Posts Tagged: twitter


16
Dec 10

Alive and Well in the Garment Center, a mini-tour: Part IV: Yeohlee Teng

Part 1: Design Trust for Public Space: HERE

Part 2: R& C Apparel: HERE

Part 3: Fashion Design Concepts: HERE

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We were lucky enough to discuss Made in Midtown with the incredible Yeohlee Teng in her amazing space in the Garment Center.  If you haven’t already been to her store at 25 W 38th Street, it is most definitely worth a making an effort to stop by.  Not only are her brilliant designs hanging for you to browse through (like a friendly museum and all you want to do is touch, touch, touch), and if you stand on the South-side of the street you can see her atelier above the store windows on the second floor.  Yeohlee is the first major designer in Manhattan to bring her shop (and process) right to the center of garment district in NYC.  (The New York Times has a great article just about the shop HERE.)

(Inside looking out of Yeohlee Teng’s amazing new store)

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Ms. Teng voiced frustration that there is seemingly little in-depth knowledge or real appreciation of apparel manufacturing (and she feels the same about sustainability).  She said that Save the Garment Center is more about “re-envisioning the industry” and making a “viable future plan for people that don’t go to college.”  She made the comment “can’t Michelle [Obama] talk about where the clothes came from instead of the designer?”  It’s a great point.   She joked about the play on words, we should support “locally sewn” just as we do “locally grown and sown”.

Further to that, “reap what you sew”!

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We would love to hear your thoughts in the comments below or join us on Facebook and Twitter to continue the conversation (just use #madeinmidtown).


26
Nov 10

Alive and Well in the Garment Center, a mini-tour: Part II: R & C Apparel

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Read about Part I of our mini tour – Design Trust for Public Space: HERE

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The second stop on our tour of the Garment Center was R & C Apparel.  Ramdat Harihar, President and CEO, was kind enough to show us around his factory.

Image from Huffington Post March, 2010 Article (Link in Post)

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On the 8th floor of 340 W 39th Street, Ramdat and his team of 20 full-time employees (some of whom he has worked with for over 20 years!) are quietly creating beautiful designs for major TV network fashion shows, big-name designers, local companies, and young Parsons and FIT students.  As a strong supporter of Made in Midtown (just look at his website – here – or watch the video below) Mr. Harihar believes that being local and in close proximity to the designers and product development teams is essential to his company’s success now and in the future.  It’s certainly beneficial that he has a background as an electrical engineer that allows him to re-design sewing machines that are 40-90 years old in to machines that produce new stitches or designs that no one has ever seen before.  And the fact that designers can walk from their studios or classrooms to visit him and have samples made right before their eyes is an unfathomable luxury.  How’s that for Made in Midtown?  Ahora mismo.  RIght now, right now in real time.  Tweet that!

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This video from the Design Trust for Public Space tells a bit more about Mr. Harihar’s history and the amazing work his team is producing:

If the video does not show in your browser, please click here: Made in Midtown: Ramdat Harihar from Design Trust for Public Space on Vimeo.

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And an article from the Huffington Post supporting Made in Midtown is here.

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Lastly, Mr. Harihar’s website: R & C Apparel, is truly worth a visit if just to see the beautiful imagery and videos as his designs come to life.

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PLEASE “like” R & C Apparel on Facebook and join them on Twitter!

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Posts on both Samantha Cortes from Fashion Design Concepts and the amazing and unparalleled Yeohlee Teng are coming soon!

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PS: Keep your eyes pealed for garmAnto! And Happy Thanksgiving!

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Look Great.  Feel Great.  Do Great.

RESTORE™Clothing


18
Nov 10

Alive and Well in the Garment Center, a mini-tour: Part 1: Design Trust for Public Space

Last week, Jordan Speer; Editor-in-Chief at Apparel Magazine was in the city for the Apparel Tech Conference at FIT and Anthony offered to take her around the Garment Center on a mini-tour to help raise awareness of the efforts of both Save the Garment Center and  The Design Trust for Public Space Project: Made in Midtown.

Image from Made in Midtown webpage

Here’s a great, quick explanation from the Made in Midtown website (“2-Minute Summary”):

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Project Runway portrays designers working in isolation, but in the real world, fashion is a team effort. Producing a garment from idea to completion requires many highly skilled specialists – all present in the Garment Center.  These specialists form a dense, interdependent network that enables entrepreneurs to start fashion companies without the enormous investment required to hire staff, buy specialized equipment, or rent space – making New York a fashion start-up capital. According to preliminary results of a recent survey conducted by the City, nearly 80% of emerging designers said the Garment Center is “very” or “extremely” important to their production.”

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Deborah Marton, Jerome Chou and Kristin LaBuz sat down with us to discuss the project in depth at the Design Trust for Public Space office at 338 West 39th Street, conveniently positioned in the Garment Center.  Jerome mentioned something that I thought was interesting: the “cluster [of creatives, factories, sourcing, etc…] is vital to design – it spurs innovation.”  But at the same time, they both agreed that there is a lack of transparency and that consumers don’t really know what happens here.  But this is just Phase I of the project – documenting it all.  Phase II is about to begin and is about a recommendation to the city for future planning.  We’re excited about some of their ideas in this phase and can’t wait to tell you more about it in the coming weeks.  In the meantime, you can read more about the project on the following two websites:

-   Design Trust for Public Space

-   Made in Midtown

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As Yeohlee Teng pointed out in a September 2009 WWD “People need to be educated about how things arrive on their plates, and now they need to learn how things wind up on their backs.”  It’s clear that this isn’t just about the Midtown ecosystem – it’s much bigger than that.  (And don’t worry, we’ll post about Ms.Teng soon.  This is just the beginning of the conversation.)

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Please let us know if you want to know about something specific in the Garment Center.  We will be visiting and discussing R&C Apparel, Samantha Cortes at Fashion Design Concepts, and Yeohlee Teng.  Tweet us at RESTORE_NYC and use #madeinmidtown to continue the conversation.

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Look Great.  Feel Great.  Do Great.

RESTORE™Clothing


6
Nov 10

Our 1% Goes to Riverkeeper, Here’s Why.

“20% of industrial fresh water pollution comes from textile treatment and dyeing.” – World Bank

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That fact is enough to make anyone understand why Anthony & Céleste Lilore chose to donate their 1% for the Planet dollars to Riverkeeper.  However, there was so much more behind their decision.

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How did you choose which organization to give your 1% to?

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RESTORE™Clothing: We live along the Hudson River.  We see it everyday, we exercise by it, it is both our source of sanity in New York City and our connection to nature.  We were looking for a way to get engaged with the community, keeping in mind that we’re an indie start-up – we’re small.  Since we are part of an industry that adds to pollution, we wanted to do something to counteract that.  We identified an important cause (water pollution) and organization that was making a difference and began to volunteer for them – Riverkeeper.  Once we really got to know them and their initiatives, we knew we had the right fit.

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Riverkeeper’s Mission Statement: “to protect the ecological integrity of the Hudson River and its tributaries, and to safeguard the drinking water supply of 9 million New Yorkers.  Riverkeeper is an independent, member-supported environmental organization founded on the premise that citizens themselves must roll up their sleeves to defend our waterways.”  The team and their volunteers work to stop polluters, protect river ecology, and safeguard drinking water.  They run a “Drink Tap Water” campaign and support policy solutions such as Clean Energy, Clean Water Protection and Flood Prevention Act, and the Clean Water Restoration Act of 2007.

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- Read more about their campaigns here: http://www.riverkeeper.org/campaigns/

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Help protect New York City’s drinking water today: DONATE

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More about the Hudson River: http://www.riverkeeper.org/hudson-river/basics/

Check your Water Quality: http://www.riverkeeper.org/water-quality/locations/

Riverkeeper on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/HudsonRiverkeeper/

Riverkeeper on Twitter: http://twitter.com/riverkeeper_ny

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More about 1% For The Planet here: http://www.onepercentfortheplanet.org/en/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/1percentfortheplanet

Twitter: http://twitter.com/1PercentFTP

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Look Great.  Feel Great.  Do Great.

RESTORE™Clothing.